Browse Items (8 total)

  • Tags: Julia Ward Howe

DOCU.1000.90A.jpg
Reprint of Julia Ward Howe's address on suffrage at the May Festival of the New England Woman Suffrage Association. The New England Woman Suffrage Association was formed in November, 1868, with Julia Ward Howe as president. The Association's annual…

DOCU.1870.07.01.jpg
Circular published by the New England Woman Suffrage Association, containing details of the first woman suffrage bazaar to be held at Music Hall in Boston. The Circular Committee requested contributions of articles for the Bazaar be sent to the…

DOCU.1902.04A.jpg
Ellen Mitchell was a philosopher, educator, and reformer. She met Julia Ward Howe at the Concord School of Philosophy in 1879. When Howe died in 1910, Mitchell published this eulogy for her.

DOCU-1890-02-1 Suffage publish request via postcard to MA newspapers addressed to Lucy Stone front.jpg
On front is handwritten "Mrs. Lucy Stone Dorchester Mass."
On back is a form letter entitled "Municipal Suffrage for Women."

PERI-1871-01 The Womans Journal June 3 1871 above the fold.jpg
In 1870, Lucy Stone and her husband, Henry Browne Blackwell, founded The Woman’s Journal, a weekly newspaper. Their daughter, Alice Stone Blackwell began work as an editor in 1883 and became the sole editor until 1917. At its founding, the Woman's…

DOCU-1000-05-1 A Pocket Book front back.jpg
Consists of quotes in support of woman suffrage from well-known public figures, including Theodore Roosevelt, William H. Taft, George William Curtis, Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Julia Ward Howe, and Abraham Lincoln.

ALMS-1890-03-1 Woman's Ethical Club program inside.jpg
Program includes presentations by Mrs. Julia Ward Howe from Rhode Island, Mrs. Kate Gannett Wells from Massachusetts, Mrs. Ellen M. Mitchell from Colorado and Mrs. Frances Fisher Wood from New York; as well as a reading of "Mother and Child", written…

ALMS-1884-03 Letter to Unknown Receipient from Office Massachussetts Suffrage Association.JPG
The handwritten letter references an enclosed petition and leaflets for municipal woman suffrage and urges the recipient to obtain as many names as possible by January 1, 1885. The letter also discusses the rising anti-suffrage movement in Boston.