Browse Items (24 total)

  • Tags: Woman's journal

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Souvenir program and admission ticket to a festival with pieces from a variety of theater and musical productions. The program includes a list of the organization's officers, performance titles, list of participants, and several pro-suffrage items,…

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Written by managing editor, Agnes E. Ryan, this pamphlet contains historical information on the "Woman's Journal." It includes an early list of stockholders and a description of the production process. It also includes illustrations of founders, Lucy…

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Alice Stone Blackwell discusses the the amount of money appropritated for education and the difference in teacher's salaries in suffrage versus non-suffrage states.

The National American Woman Suffrage Association published a series of circulars…

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Alice Stone Blackwell addresses the idea that if women were granted the right to vote, they should also be able to fight as a soldier or a police officer. She argues that a significant portion of men are neither soldier or police officer, but still…

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Originally published in 1908 in the "San Francisco Examiner", Dorothy Dix (pseudonym of American journalist Elizabeth Meriwether Gilmer) addresses taxation, the differences between men and women, household budgets, morals, education, and other…

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Portion of an article from the Saturday Evening Post written by Dr. Woods Hutchinson, an English physician. Hutchinson argues that women's experience as homemakers is the reason they should be politically active.

The National American Woman…

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Alice Stone Blackwell uses real-life examples to make the case that positive progress for women has never been made when the majority of people approve, but rather when a "persistent few."

The National American Woman Suffrage Association published…

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Alice Stone Blackwell argues that the issues of whether women should have the right to vote and whether they should work outside of the home are separate and unrelated. She also makes the point that the most successful governments are controlled by…

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Suffragist, Susan Walker Fitzgerald argues that the United States is not a democracy because the power does not rest with the entire population. She claims that those opposed to women's suffrage are wealthier women who do not need the vote to improve…

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Reprinted from the Woman's Journal, pacifist and social reformer, Edwin D. Mead refutes the argument that government rests on force and women should not be permitted to vote based on their ability to be physically defend the nation as a soldier or…